Self-Reflection

Self-Reflection

February 02, 2020 | Lisa Degrenia

Passage: 2 Corinthians 3:17-18

    I have absolutely no control over the middle of my day. Every day is different. The unplanned and unexpected happen regularly. The only part of my day I have any possibility of anchoring is the beginning and end of my day, the bookends.

    What I'm starting to do, and invite you to do, is to anchor, to ground the bookends of our day with spiritual practices that keep us connected to God.

    I need these practices so that when the unexpected happens, troubles or joys, I'm ready for it spiritually.

    Testimony of the Death of Hal Stanton
    The death of the faithful is not a tragedy. It's, of course, sad and we grieve. We love and we miss Hal.

    But Hal was ready. He had conversations the days before his death that were full of peace, hope, gratitude, and love. His wife Margot was ready. This doesn't diminish the sadness or grieving. We have the sadness and grieving while we are also anchored in the promises and hope of heaven. It can be both at the same time.

    Hal's kids were ready. While we were gathered around his hospital bed last night, we sang his favorite hymn, we spoke to him and held his hand, we prayed, and it was peace. We were all moving forward together in the light, love, and presence of God.

    I want to be ready. I want to be ready to serve and love and have a good word from God. And I want to be ready when its time to go home to heaven. By the grace and power of Almighty God, we can be.

    If I had to start from absolute scratch with spiritual practices, what would be the first three I would want to know, practice and teach? These timeless three create a sacred rhythm in our lives: Scripture, Stillness, and Self Reflection.

    Scripture
    We all need a scripture reading plan to read the Word of God for ourselves. In reading the Word of God we begin to know what's God's voice and what isn't. We get grounded in the promises of God and the character of God. We're strengthened by the stories of God's people.

    Click Here for a great reading plan for beginners
    Click Here for a plan that covers the entire Bible

    Stillness
    Stop and spend time with God no agenda. We come simply, openly, honestly, just as we are. Our world is busy, full, and loud. I need stillness to remember- Be still and know that I am God and that I'm not God.

    Click Here for last week's message on stillness

    Self-Reflection
    Start your day with Scripture Reading and Silence. End your day by reflecting on it with God

    All of these practices, including self-reflection, are rooted in Scripture.
    2 Corinthians 13:5
    Examine yourselves to see whether you are living in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not realize that Jesus Christ is in you?...

    The presence of God is with us and in us and through us.

    Lamentations 3:40-41
    Let us test and examine our ways, and return to the Lord. Let us lift up our hearts as well as our hands to God in heaven.

    2 Corinthians 3:17-18
    Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And all of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another; for this comes from the Lord, the Spirit.

    The practices of scripture, stillness, and self-reflection bring us freedom. All of us can have unveiled faces before God. We can take off the mask and be real and honest. These practices bring transformation in our lives- we are made new, we are healed, we are forgiven, we are empowered by the Holy Spirit.

    These practices are not only rooted in scripture but are also practiced throughout the history of God's people. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), the founder of the Jesuits, wrote a set of reflection questions. They're wonderful. They're known as The Examen and are still used today.

    John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism, wrote 22 questions. John's an overachiever and a little compulsive. These questions are also wonderful and still used today.

    Our set of 8 questions are a mixture of questions from many sources. They have the essence of Ignatius' Examen and Wesley's questions.

    Self Reflection is a new practice for me. I start my day with scripture and stillness and end my day with self-reflection. Bookends. This is the sacred rhythm I'm trying out. Find the sacred rhythm that works for you.

    When I did the self-reflection questions right before bed, I found I was way too tired. So I moved the practice to the end of my workday to help me transition from work to home.

    Here’s what I noticed since using the self-reflection questions
    It helps me decompress from the day.
    It keeps me awake and alive in the Holy Spirit.
    It helps me to be more intentional- eyes to see, ears to hear

    I also noticed the longer I keep to the practice, the richer it becomes. It started off simple, even superficial. But as the days passed, I began to trust myself more so I could be more honest with myself. I also began to trust I could be more and more honest with God.

    Let’s walk through the questions.

    1. What happened today?
    Make a quick bullet list or write a narrative

    2. Glory Sighting: Where did you see evidence of the Holy Spirit at work in others? In and through you?
    This helps us not gloss over God's presence. We practice seeing God, praising God, and testifying to it.

    3. What did you read/hear/learn?
    Christians are lifelong learners. Jesus was a teacher. We are students. We are disciples.

    4. What are you thankful for?
    Gratitude opens us to the joy of the Lord which is our strength.

    5. How are you feeling emotionally?
    Be honest and seek Christ’s perspective

    6. Where did you miss a Spirit-led opportunity of loving God, others, and yourself?
    This is a lovely way of saying, Where did you blow it today? Where did you embarrass the family of God?

    We need a point of confession. There's something about writing it down which relieves the burden of guilt (real or false). I'm not trying to hide it from God or take care of it in my own strength. God please heal me, forgive me, and help me.

    7. What are you asking the Holy Spirit to do in you and through you?
    This is the question of mission, purpose, and call. God help me fulfill your plan for me.

    8. What will you do tomorrow to be more available to the movement of the Holy Spirit?
    This is intention and action. By doing it late in the day, you already have the intention for the next day.

    Series Information

    Simple, timeless practices so you can experience God for yourself

    Other sermons in the series

    January 26, 2020

    Quiet Your Soul

    Why and how to practice solitude, silence, and stillness as a Christian...